Underwater New York, The Bronx River

 

Friday February 22, 2013

7:00pm-9:00pm

At BRAC’s temporary space 305 East 140th St. #1A, Bronx, NY 10454

This event is FREE and open to the public!

Underwater New York is a digital journal of writing, art and music inspired by real-life objects found in the waterways of NYC. In conjunction with “Process and Progress,” UNY has invited three writers with strong ties to the Bronx to write original fiction or poetry around surprising once-submerged Bronx River finds like a piano, a human skull, a horse trailer and more.

Featuring:

Allison Amend

Rich Villar

Carolyn Ferrell

Wade in the water

wade-1

Friday February 15, 2013

7:00pm-9:00pm

At BRAC’s temporary space 305 East 140th St. #1A, Bronx, NY 10454

This event is FREE and open to the public!

Join Meta Local Collaborative and BRAC for a special panel discussion about the different efforts to improve the Bronx waterfronts, with

Damian Griffin the Bronx River Alliance’s Education Director,

Kellie Terry-Sepulveda Executive Director of The POINT CDC,

Chauncy Young, Community Organizer from the Harlem River Working Group,

Mychal Johnson from South Bronx Unite as well as other Bronx activists.

Take me to the river

 

Tuesday February 12, 2013

7:00pm-9:00pm

At BRAC’s temporary space 305 East 140th St. #1A, Bronx, NY 10454

Join Meta Local Collaborative and BRAC for  “Take me to the River”,  connecting the Bronx River’s past and future histories with presentations and conversations with:

Morgan Powell, Editor, Bronx River Sankofa

Anthony Thomas the Environmental Justice Coordinator from Youth Ministries for Peace and Justice.

Amanda Schachter and Alexander Levi, SLO Architecture

Event is  FREE and open to the public.

Process and Progress: Drew Manahan, Meta Local Collaborative & The Bronx River Alliance

Process-progress-river

On View from February 01 – February 23

Gallery Location: 305 E. 140th Street, #1A, Bronx, NY 10454
Reception: Friday, February 1, 2013, 6-9pm

GALLERY HOURS: Wednesday–Friday, 3pm–6:30pm / Saturday, 12pm–5pm FREE ADMISSION

Bronx, NY, January, 2013—Bronx River Art Center (BRAC) is proud to announce Process and Progress: Drew Manahan, Meta Local Collaborative & The Bronx River Alliance. This is the third in the series of five exhibitions that invites artists and architects to engage with systems of urban development in the Bronx and beyond. Process and Progress is presented in BRAC’s temporary gallery space in Mott Haven while our permanent facility in West Farms is undergoing renovation.

The exhibition series, Process and Progress: Engaging in Community Change, highlights the Bronx River Art Center’s development during a time of significant structural and cultural change in the borough. BRAC’s major building renovation project, now underway, is leading the way for more environmentally sustainable and technologically advanced designs within our local West Farms Community. At the same time, the surrounding area has become home to new and imminent urban development projects that will dramatically impact the built environment, social fabric, and cultural composition of our local community.

Process and Progress: Drew Manahan, Meta Local Collaborative & The Bronx River Alliance focuses on the past, the present and the future of the Bronx River. Architect Drew Manahan explores how the wilderness around the river has resurfaced within the South Bronx’s urban environment through renderings and drawings and how this evolving ecology and the river is creating new ephemeral or transcendental experiences for the borough’s dwellers.

In partnership with the Bronx River Alliance, Meta Local Collaborative has curated a selection of photos, plans, maps, ephemera from the Alliance’s archives. They trace how spaces along the river has changed throughout the years, revisit past restoration and recreation plans, and consider the river’s present state and plans for its future. In addition, Meta Local is showcasing work they are developing focused on public access to the Bronx River Greenway.

Artists and Partners:

Andrew Manahan is an Eagle Scout from Northwest Ohio who received his Bachelors of Science in Architecture from the University of Cincinnati and his Masters of Architecture from the Cranbrook Academy of Art. His vision is to create architectural and cultural policy through an opportunistic and proactive practice. He completed his first building just this past year through a mixture of contemporary and digital fabrication techniques and traditional woodwork and handcraft, featured in Metropolis magazine. Andrew has become increasingly interested in the reemergence of wilderness and nature in highly populated or recently vacated urban areas, and is interested in crafting a relationship between culture architecture and wilderness.

Meta Local Collaborative is the practice of Elizabeth Hamby and Hatuey Ramos Fermin. Their work investigates the dynamics of urban spaces, exploring the histories of buildings and neighborhoods, and tracing the flows of people, ideas and products. Combining documentary strategies with performance and fine art, they articulate concepts of origin, and the sense of place. Meta Local develops site-specific, participatory works that refer to the complexity of their community in the South Bronx and beyond. The artists observe, analyze, and dissect the social, cultural and economic structures of their neighborhood, as well as the design and organization of buildings and spaces, and use the information gathered to develop questions that serve as a foundation for their projects.

The Bronx River Alliance serves as a coordinated voice for the river and works in harmonious partnership to protect, improve and restore the Bronx River corridor so that it can be a healthy ecological, recreational, educational and economic resource for the communities through which the river flows.

While the Bronx was Burning, Casa Amadeo was holding it down

Photo Documentation by Jo Q Nelson, Chad Stayrook and Hatuey Ramos-Fermín While the Bronx was

Burning, Casa Amadeo was holding it down was a multi-modal installation and series of public programs. This project was produced collaboratively by Elizabeth HambyHatuey Ramos-Fermín, and  Action Club  (Chris DomenickKerry Downey, Jo Q. NelsonDouglas Paulson), as part of Shifting Communities, a sequence of exhibitions curated by Chad Stayrook at the Bronx River Art Center. Casa Amadeo is a record shop and a cultural treasure trove preserving the history and vitality of Latin music in the South Bronx. By choosing it as a launch pad, we are able to explore ideas of community, collaboration, and culture. In response to challenges we each have in our individual artwork and our shared concerns about the responsibilities of socially engaged art, we gave each other assignments that respond to Casa Amadeo’s rich social, visual, and acoustic space. DEATH TO FALSE BOOGALOO mixtape in collaboration with Douglas Paulson, Kerry Downey, Hatuey Ramos Fermín   El Elemento del Bronx Panel Discussion

The first Bronx Music Heritage Center (BMHC) Latin Music roundtable, “El Elemento del Bronx, a Latin Jazz Tale”, was moderated by Bill Aguado  of the Bronx Music Heritage Center with guests: Elena Martinez, folklorist; Bobby Sanabria, multi-nominated Grammy bandleader, drummer, and educator;Michael Max Knobbe, Executive Director of Bronx Net; Angel R. Rodriguez Sr., musician, arranger and Bronx Living Legends producer; and Al Quiñones, producer of 52 Park Music Series. Roundtable guests have distinguished themselves as Latin Jazz music leaders and historians, representing the Bronx through their creativity and commitment.
Participants discussed the role of demographic shifts in the Bronx in the shaping of the musical landscape of today, the evolution of Latin Music over the last 30 years, and the role of women musicians in the Latin music field.

Hip Hop then, now and tomorrow… Panel Discussion

The second Bronx Music Heritage Center (BMHC) roundtable was moderated by Bill Aguado of the Bronx Music Heritage Center with guests: Patty Dukes  and Reph Starr of Circa 95Steven Sapp and Mildred Ruiz Sapp of UniVersesFred OnesJane Gabriels of  Pepatian, and Rockafella of Full Circle Dance. Each of the roundtable participants has included within their body of work a sense of cultural and social justice.
Hip hop has become the chronicler of our times, providing historical context of issues, concerns, social attitudes, and negative stereotypes Panelists will be asked to reflect on hip hop as they remember it and talk about what  hip hop is today. They  also were asked about how the changing demographics influenced hip hop as a genre. The BMHC is committed to preserving the legacy of hip hop and other music genres in the Bronx for current and future generations. This conversation was documented in audio and video and was added to the growing archive of the Bronx Music Heritage Center for sharing with the broader community.

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Documentary Film Screenings: